sabato 5 novembre 2016

Hans von Aachen (1552 – 4 March 1615) Painter

Hans von Aachen

Hans von Aachen (Colonia, 1552 – Praga, 4 marzo 1615) è stato un pittore tedesco.

 

Biografia

Nato da una famiglia originaria della città di Aquisgrana (in tedesco Aachen, da cui il nome), è allievo del fiammingo Georg Jerrigh. Si formò sotto l'influsso dell'opera di Bartolomeus Spranger, prima di proseguire gli studi nel 1574 in Italia, a Firenze, dove dipinge diversi ritratti, a Roma e forse anche a Venezia, dal momento che egli sembra avere assimilato anche la lezione del Tintoretto: qui sono le radici del suo manierismo.
Torna in Germania nel 1588 e si fa una buona fama di ritrattista presso committenti di Colonia, della casa ducale dei Wittelsbach di Monaco di Baviera e nella famiglia dei banchieri Fugger ad Augusta. Nel 1592 dipinge a Praga il ritratto dell'imperatore Rodolfo II e diviene pittore della corte imperiale svolgendo anche incarichi diplomatici.
Nel 1596 si sposa con la figlia del grande musicista fiammingo Orlando di Lasso e dal 1601 risiede definitivamente a Praga, dove muore nel 1615.
I motivi della sua pittura risiedono in rappresentazioni religiose, mitologiche e allegoriche; come il suo Trionfo della Verità, tipico dipinto manierista che, pur nelle ridotte dimensioni, unisce perfezione tecnica e composizione accurata.
Aachen ha più volte affrontato temi mitologici e allegorici, rappresentando spesso nudi femminili, come nel Bacco, Cerere e Amore del Kunsthistorisches Museum di Vienna, dove i nudi, in pose eleganti e modellati con disinvolta sprezzatura, trasmettono una forte carica erotica, indicativa del gusto dell'imperatore Rodolfo.
Il suo stile unisce il manierismo fiorentino al caldo colore veneziano, insieme con il naturalismo fiammingo.

Aachen Selbstbildnis
Hans von Aachen


Hans von Aachen (1552 – 4 March 1615) was a German artist, one of the leading painters of Northern Mannerism. He was trained in the tradition of Netherlandish Renaissance painting but then spent 14 years in Italy, based in Venice, before returning to Germany, but to Bavaria in the south-west rather than his native Rhineland in the north-east.
He was a versatile and productive artist, though preferring to work on a small scale; many of his works are cabinet paintings on copper. He was successful as a painter of princely and aristocratic portraits, and was also able to turn his hand to religious and mythological subjects, as well as the eroticized allegories enjoyed by the patron of his last years, Emperor Rudolph II. These remain the works for which he is best known. He also painted a number of genre paintings of small groups of figures shown from the chest upwards, laughing, often apparently using himself as a model.
He remained based in Munich for several years after being appointed court artist to Rudolf in 1592, but finally moved to Rudolf's capital in Prague, where he died, having outlived his master's downfall and death by a few years; unlike most of Rudolf's artists he was retained by his successor Matthias I. Rudolph also used him as an advisor on his art collecting and what is usually called a "diplomat"; in other words he travelled to the owners of art collections to convey the emperor's often shameless bullying to make them accept his offers for their treasures.
Although he did not produce prints himself, his paintings were much reproduced by other artist's in Rudolph's stable, and became well known and influential across Europe, although the Mannerist style fell from fashion soon after his death. The first major exhibition devoted to him was in Aachen, Prague and Vienna in 2010.

Biography

He was born in Cologne, but his name is derived from the birthplace of his father, Aachen in Germany. Other variations of the name include Johann von - and - von Achen and various concisions like Janachen, Fanachen, Abak, Jean Dac, Aquano, van Aken etc.
Hans von Aachen began painting in Germany as a pupil of the Flemish master E. Jerrigh. He then, like many northern artists of his time, such as Bartholomeus Spranger spent a long period in Italy. He lived in Venice from 1574 to 1588 and toured Florence and Rome during that period. He initially became a pupil of Kaspar Rems, but soon decided to develop his own mannerist technique, by studying Tintoretto and Michelangelo's followers. However, during all of his life he was influenced by the style of Bartholomeus Spranger and Hendrick Goltzius who dominated the art scene in Germany at the time.
He returned to Germany in 1588 where he became well known as a painter of portraits for noble houses. He also produced historical and religious scenes and earned a wide reputation. Among his patrons were the Fugger family. He painted several works for Duke William V of Bavaria. He married Regina, the daughter of the composer Orlando di Lasso in Munich. In Munich he came into contact with the Imperial Court in Prague. In 1592 he was appointed official painter of Rudolph II, Holy Roman Emperor. However, Von Aachen only moved to Prague years later (there is contention as to the date - 1601 or 1597), where he stayed and was commissioned to paint mythological and allegorical subjects such as his Liberation of Hungary (1598, Budapest). Emperor Rudolph II conferred knighthood on him in 1605. He became good friends with Kryštof Popel the Younger of Lobkowicz, the Chief Steward of the Kingdom of Bohemia. Von Aachen continued working on commissions under the newly appointed ruler, Matthias I. He died in Prague.
Amongst van Aachen's pupils were Peter Isaak and Joseph Heinz. His works have been copied by Wolfgang Kilian, Dominicus Custos and Jan Sadeler.

 Two laughing men (double self-portrait). Ca. 1574.
Hans von Aachen
Augustus and the Tiburtine Sibyl. Ca. 1580-1585. Pen in brown, heightened with white. 33 × 27.9 cm. Los Angeles, Los Angeles County Museum of Art.
Hans von Aachen 

The rape of Proserpine. 1587. oil on canvas. 109 × 150 cm (42.9 × 59.1 in). Sibiu, Brukenthal National Museum.
Hans von Aachen
The judgment of Paris. 1588. oil on canvas. 87.5 × 133 cm (34.4 × 52.4 in). Douai, Musée de la Chartreuse.
Hans von Aachen
   Portrait of William V, Duke of Bavaria. Ca. 1589. Landshut, Trausnitz Castle (?).
 Hans von Aachen
The finding of the True Cross. Oil on canvas. 156.9 × 210.9 cm. London, Christie's (16 December 1998).
Hans von Aachen -  circa 1589
 Martyrdom of Saint Sebastian. 1590s. oil on oak panel. 65 × 58.5 cm (25.6 × 23 in).
 Warsaw, National Museum in Warsaw (MNW).
 Hans von Aachen
The Amazement of the Gods (?). 1590s (?). Oil on copper. 35.5 × 45.8 cm. London, National Gallery.
Hans von Aachen 



The Holy Family. between 1588 and 1590. oil on panel. 56.2 × 42.2 cm (22.1 × 16.6 in). Saint Petersburg, Hermitage Museum.
Hans von Aachen
 
Pallas Athena, Venus and Juno. 1593. oil on canvas. 54 × 67 cm (21.3 × 26.4 in). Boston, Museum of Fine Arts.
Hans von Aachen 

Portrait of a young man. Oil on panel. 45.7 × 35.3 cm. New York, Christie's (26 January 2005).
Hans von Aachen - circa 1590-1595
A couple at a guesthouse. Ca. 1596.
Hans von Aachen
Couple with a mirror. Ca. 1596.
Hans von Aachen

 Marienkrönung
circa 1596 
Venus, Cupid and a satyr. circa 1595-1598. copper. 30.5 × 21 cm (12 × 8.3 in). Vienna, Kunsthistorisches Museum.
Hans von Aachen

The Triumpg of Truth. 1598. oil on copper. 56 × 47 cm (22 × 18.5 in). Munich, Alte Pinakothek.
Hans von Aachen

 Design of the frontispiece of the Virgil edition by Jacobus Pontanus. circa 1599. brown pen over pencil on paper. 33 × 20.8 cm (13 × 8.2 in). Göttingen, Kunstsammlung der Universität.
Hans von Aachen
Allegory on the battle of Șelimbăr. circa 1599. brown pen. 24 × 25.3 cm (9.4 × 10 in). New York, Metropolitan Museum of Art.
Hans von Aachen

 Tobit and the Angel. brown pen. 22.9 × 20.5 cm (9 × 8.1 in). New York, Metropolitan Museum of Art.
Hans von Aachen - between 1567 and 1600

Ecce Homo. circa 1590-1600. brown pen. 36.2 × 27.6 cm (14.3 × 10.9 in). New York, Metropolitan Museum of Art.
Hans von Aachen
 
Bacchus, Venus and Cupid. circa 1595-1600. canvas. 63 × 50 cm (24.8 × 19.7 in). Vienna, Kunsthistorisches Museum.
 Hercules defeating the vices. circa 1600. black pen over chalk on paper. 31.1 × 21.1 cm (12.2 × 8.3 in). Göttingen, Kunstsammlung der Universität.
 Hans von Aachen
The liberation of Andromeda. circa 1600. painting on alabaster. 38 × 45 cm (15 × 17.7 in). Innsbruck, Ambras Castle.
Hans von Aachen
The fall of Phaëton. circa 1600. Innsbruck, Ambras Castle.
Hans von Aachen
front: Adonis held back by Venus while going hunting. circa 1600. brown pen. 19 × 25.3 cm (7.5 × 10 in). Paris, Musée du Louvre.
Hans von Aachen

reverse: A naked child laying on its back. circa 1600. brown pen (?). 19 × 25.3 cm (7.5 × 10 in). Paris, Musée du Louvre.
Hans von Aachen
Bacchus, Ceres and Amor. circa 1600. oil on canvas. 163 × 113 cm (64.2 × 44.5 in). Vienna, Kunsthistorisches Museum.
Hans von Aachen
 
Expulsion from Paradise. 25 × 21.5 cm (9.8 × 8.5 in). Innsbruck, Ambras Castle.
Hans von Aachen -     after 1600
 Allegory of Peace, Art, and Abundance. 1602. oil on canvas. 197 × 142 cm (77.6 × 55.9 in). Saint Petersburg, Hermitage Museum.
 Hans von Aachen

Allegory on the declaration of war before Constantinople. circa 1603-1604. Paper or parchment mounted on canvas. 34 × 42 cm (13.4 × 16.5 in). Vienna, Kunsthistorisches Museum.
Hans von Aachen
Allegory on the battle of Gurăslău. circa 1603-1604. Paper or parchment mounted on canvas. 34 × 42 cm (13.4 × 16.5 in). Vienna, Kunsthistorisches Museum.
Hans von Aachen
Allegory on the battle of Sisak. circa 1603-1604. Paper or parchment mounted on canvas. 34 × 42 cm (13.4 × 16.5 in). Vienna, Kunsthistorisches Museum. 
 Allegory on the battle of Braşov. circa 1603-1604. Paper or parchment mounted on canvas. 34 × 42 cm (13.4 × 16.5 in). Vienna, Kunsthistorisches Museum.
Hans von Aachen
Allegory on the battle of Braşov. circa 1603-1604. Paper or parchment mounted on canvas. 34 × 42 cm (13.4 × 16.5 in). Vienna, Kunsthistorisches Museum.
Hans von Aachen
Portrait of Anna of Austria (1585-1618). 1604. canvas. 58 × 48 cm (22.8 × 18.9 in). Vienna, Kunsthistorisches Museum.
Hans von Aachen
The Three Graces. 1604. oil on canvas. 209.7 × 138.6 cm (82.6 × 54.6 in). Bucharest, National Museum of Art of Romania.
Hans von Aachen  
 
Pan and Selene. 1600-1605. Oil on panel. 40 × 49.2 cm. London, Christie's (7 december 2010).
Hans von Aachen 

Boy with grapes. circa 1600-1605. panel. 45 × 36 cm (17.7 × 14.2 in). Vienna, Kunsthistorisches Museum.
Hans von Aachen
Virgin and Child. 1606. oil on panel. 37.5 × 26 cm (14.8 × 10.2 in). Dinant, Premonstratensian abbey of Leffe.
Hans von Aachen
Portrait of Rudolf II, Holy Roman Emperor. circa 1606-1608. canvas. Vienna, Kunsthistorisches Museum.
Hans von Aachen 

 Matchmaking scene. circa 1605-1610. panel. 113.5 × 133 cm (44.7 × 52.4 in). Vienna, Kunsthistorisches Museum.
 Hans von Aachen

The Annunciation. 1610.
Hans von Aachen
Matthias, Holy Roman Emperor, as King of Bohemia. 1612. Oil on canvas. Prague, Prague Castle.
Hans von Aachen

Portrait of a man, possibly Johannes Kepler. Ca. 1612. Prague, National Gallery in Prague.
Hans von Aachen

 Bildnis einer jungen Frau, Öl auf Holz, 48,5 x 35,4 cm, variierte Werkstattwiederholung eines nach 1612 entstandenen Porträts Hans von Aachens in Prag

The Good Samaritan. brown pen. 21.6 × 31.2 cm (8.5 × 12.3 in). Paris, Musée du Louvre.
Hans von Aachen  - between 1567 and 1615
David and Bathsheba. circa 1612-1615. canvas. 138 × 105 cm (54.3 × 41.3 in). Vienna, Kunsthistorisches Museum.
Hans von Aachen

 Deutsch: Venus und Adnois mit Jagdhunden
English: Venus and Adonis with hounds
 by 1615

front: Allegory on mortality. ink on paper. 23 × 17.5 cm (9.1 × 6.9 in). Braunschweig, Herzog Anton Ulrich-Museum.
Hans von Aachen
judith mit dem haupt des holofernes by hans von aachen

Mercury and Ceres flying through the air. brown pen. 15.3 × 17.7 cm (6 × 7 in). Paris, Musée du Louvre.
Hans von Aachen

 A Courtesan with Her Procuress

     
Jan Saenredam. Portrait of Hans von Aachen. 1601. 


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